Vogue Pattern 8979 Finished!

photo 1 Front door in V8979

And I like it!

After all the delays, the pondering, the color-bleeding batik fabric and sundry life-stuff thrown at me, I have finished Vogue 8979. The batik was a long time occupant of my fabric stash and I was totally willing to use it as a wearable muslin. As it turned out, I am taking away the “muslin” designation and am finding this top very wearable.

So here are a few new thoughts about this pattern.

  • When making a new-to-me pattern, I usually follow the designer’s lead and make it exactly according to the guide sheet. Unless there’s a step which is beyond my comprehension. And that’s what I did with 8979.

Front

  •  The finished project pretty closely resembles the illustration on the pattern envelope and I am thanking the sewing gods profusely.
  •  It’s described as semi-fitted; it turned out closely fitted in the tummy/hip (aka spare tire) for me, even after careful comparison. According to the finished garment numbers printed on the pattern tissue, I should have been OK in the stomach/hip area with size 16; but I had to let out the side seam. So, see tip #2 below.
  • I’m glad I kept the back zipper. The neckline is low enough that I could have skipped the back zipper, but I’ve saved that change for the next version.

Back

  •  Speaking of the neckline, it is a tad lower than I usually wear. Will have to work that out in the next version of this top, or forever wear a camisole. The selfie below shows a more modestly pinned up neckline….

Front selfie

  • It ain’t Easy/Facile as marked on the envelope. I’d love to know what the pattern company’s guidelines are for Easy/Facile patterns.
  •  I’m not sure why the pleats on lower left are hidden, after all that work. My next version will have these pleats peeking out.

Pleats

  •  Don’t want to seem stupid or anything, but the attachment of the right back neckband (below) took me 24 hours to fully understand and execute.

Upper back

  • Front left neckband is very fiddly at the lower point to get neatly done. But its do-able. Next version (and there will be one) is going to see the two neck bands interfaced.

Front right band

  • Speaking of next version, how about this double faced silk jacquard found in my stash? It’s a muddy olive green on one side, and a muddier mustard yellow on the other.

Double sided silk

More September Sewing Tips:

Sewing Tip #1:

Mark finished steps on guidesheet

Guidesheet

Maybe it’s advancing age, but I am now circling construction steps on the guide sheet which pertain to my view only, with color pencil, then checking off that step in another color when complete. Saves me a few seconds to see where I stopped at the last sewing session. Why did I not think of this before?

Sewing Tip #2

 Measure the Flat Pattern

Pinned

This may seem obvious but it bears repeating. Rely on the printed finished dimensions AND measure the flat pattern in the torso area, AND yourself before cutting out the tissue. Just in case, cut out the next size in that area. It can always be taken in.

Sewing Tip #3

Tighter Armhole Required for Sleeveless Look

Right front in process

The fronts (left & right) and back are the same pattern piece for all views in Vogue 8979. With the sleeveless view, A, the armhole should be made smaller and higher by adjusting the paper pattern. Move the cutting line at front (left & right) and back underarm point to at least 1” inwards, and at least 1” higher.

This top is a welcome addition to my closet! Sewn any new-to-you patterns lately? Let’s have it in the comments section!

Samina

 

 

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6 thoughts on “Vogue Pattern 8979 Finished!

  1. Love your beautiful new top, Samina! Looks like all the ‘pondering’ was worth it! The double-faced silk is the perfect choice for a second try. Thank you for the tips and information regarding your journey to completion on this one.
    P.S. I prefer the lower neckline on you!

    Like

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